Thursday, April 06, 2006

To FiOS, Or Not To FiOS - That Is The Question

For high-speed internet, there are more choices if you happen to live in lucky service areas. It not just a choice between DSL (formally fast) or cable access anymore.

This extensive review from CNET -

Some assembly required
By Matt Lake - CNET Reviews - April 3, 2006

Some roads to broadband Internet access are smooth. Because of this, they are the roads most traveled in the quest for ever more streaming video and a Web and e-mail experience without an overture of modem beeps.

Take DSL, if it's available in your area. Sign up for it, get a self-install kit, and after you've plugged in a few filters and installed the hardware and software you need, you're online. It's not as easy as installing AOL software, perhaps, but about the same price and a lot faster.

Or take cable. If you happen to have a cable outlet in the room where you'll be computing (or the one you're using for a wireless access point), you do another self-install. If you don't have a convenient outlet, you pay Comcast 50 bucks to come out, drag wire into your computer room, and sign on the line that commits you to paying about $45 per month. Assuming you can tolerate the other kind of "broad band" (the extrawide time slot needed to allocate to a visit from the cable guy), it's that simple.

But just because these two types of Internet access are the most common and the smoothest to install, don't assume they're your only choice. In a few regions, there are two other ways to get online. If they were available in my area, I'd be all over them.These two alternative broadband technologies are consumer-grade fiber-optic access (spearheaded by Verizon's FiOS) and municipal wireless, such as the newly available service in Upper Dublin, Pennsylvania.
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Roads less traveled

So there are two other ways to zoom onto the Internet. For now, sadly, they're available only in a few communities. FiOS will most likely spread faster than municipal wireless, but who knows which service will land in your community first.

So here's a question for you: If you had the choice between FiOS, BreezeAccess, or the DSL/cable route, which would you take?
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Ahhhh ... choices, choices, choices!

7 comments:

lessgov said...

I would choose FiOS, personally. However, I wouldn't be so certain that FiOS is coming to a town near you. The cable companies don't like the idea of having competitors provide an alternate service, so they have worked with local governments to lock companies like Verizon out. This has even happened in New Jersey, which is Verizon's home state. So if you want FiOS service, you might need to talk to your local legislator.

pkp646 said...

If Verizon can't even get into its local market in New Jersey, I doubt I'll be able to get it here anytime soon. That's really a shame. How can local governments allow these monopolies? Don't they see that competition is what is truly best for the customer? I hope that things work out in New Jersey for Verizon.

pkp646 said...

If Verizon can't even get into its local market in New Jersey, I doubt I'll be able to get it here anytime soon. That's really a shame. How can local governments allow these monopolies? Don't they see that competition is what is truly best for the customer? I hope that things work out in New Jersey for Verizon.

Jerseygirl said...

Yea, I'm not sure "To FiOS, Or Not To FiOS" is the quetion...I think the better question is: why are the cablecos working so hard to prevent me from FiOSing!

paulaner01 said...

Heck yes that's the question - and it's because they've gotten pretty comfortable being the only option in town for so long, and now they're scared to death that their monopoly is crumbling. I'm all for it, because if FiOS is bad news for cable companies I'm pretty sure it's good news for me.

Timothy Karr said...

Readers of this comment thread should know that lessgov, Paulaner01 and pkp646 are part of a tag-team of industry shills who invade blog comments on net neutrality or related issues and to argue against any government regulation of the telephone companies. Other names who run with this crowd are John Rice, oldhats, and AJ Carey. (Google any of these names in combination and you'll see how their game works).

By tag-teaming the blogs, this small handful of individuals gives the false impression of broad popular support for an industry-friendly position.

What they fail to point out is that Net Neutrality has been the rule that has governed access to the Internet since its inception. It's the reason that the Internet has become such a dynamic force for new ideas, economic innovation and free speech. What they really want is for Congress to radically re-write our telecommunications laws so that companies like AT&T, Verizon and BellSouth can swoop in and become gatekeepers to Internet content -- in a way that benefits no one except the largest ISPs.

I'd like these people to tell us how it is that they appear together (usually one after the other) spouting identical industry talking points.

What gives fellas? Are you being paid to do this? And by whom?

ecj said...

Timothy:

Maybe the posts are from the same person, do you think? Ala Michael Hiltzik at the LA Times.

Follow Link - http://maxine-log.blogspot.com/2006/04/los-angeles-times-renders-verdict-on.html