Saturday, June 03, 2006

Meteor 1, Earth 0 - The End To Global Warming

An April 2006 satellite image from the Australian Bureau of Meterology shows Australia. A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said. Image Credit: AFP/ABM-HO/File

Hey, Al Gore, what happens to your "An Inconvenient Truth" if one of these "big boys" finds the Earth on its way between Galaxies? It would pretty much "bum your buzz", do ya' think?

Excerpts from AFP via Yahoo! News -

Meteor mega-hit spawned Australian continent: researchers
By AFP, Washington D.C. - Fri Jun 2, 1:54 PM ET


A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said.

Ohio State University scientists said the 483-kilometer-wide (300-mile-wide) crater is now hidden more than 1.6 kilometers (one mile) beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

"Gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out," the university said in a statement Thursday.
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The Wilkes Land crater is more than twice the size of the Chicxulub crater in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, which marks the impact that may have ultimately killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

The Chicxulub meteor is thought to have been 9.6 kilometers (six miles) wide, while the Wilkes Land meteor could have been up to 48.3 kilometers (30 miles) wide -- four or five times wider.

"This Wilkes Land impact is much bigger than the impact that killed the dinosaurs, and probably would have caused catastrophic damage at the time," said Ralph von Frese, a professor of geological sciences at Ohio State.

He and Laramie Potts, a postdoctoral researcher in geological sciences, led the team that discovered the crater. They collaborated with other Ohio State and NASA scientists, as well as partners from Russia and South Korea. They reported their preliminary results in a recent American Geophysical Union Joint Assembly meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.
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"All the environmental changes that would have resulted from the impact would have created a highly caustic environment that was really hard to endure. So it makes sense that a lot of life went extinct at that time," he said.
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Look, if you really want to create fear on Earth, tell everyone that a large meteor is headed our way and we can not do anything about it.

If you want to create a climate of fear on which you can raise funds and run for President ... again, you -
  • First, create the internet so that you can communicate to (not with) people
  • Second, create a really un-watchable cable channel that plays off of the internet you created so that you can call yourself a media mogul
  • Third, make a movie that over-reaches on the issue of what could really be normal processes that govern the climate of The Earth and call it "Global Warming" to convince people that you are "the one", the only one, who can do something about it ... "if only I were your President!"

That Al Gore, he's a pretty crafty fellow! INCOMING!



1 comment:

Chip said...

Volcanos and impacts are so powerful that twittering about global warming seems goofy.

I've been writing about catastrophism a little at my blog. One volcanic eruption can lower global temperatures as much as a century of "global warming." Warming, it could be argued, is just some insurance until the next Tambora, Krakatoa, or God forbid, Toba or Yellowstone erupts. It will happen, a volcanic mass extinction, with the associated ice age. It's only a question of when.

And guess what? Merapi is rumbling as we speak. Indonesia has produced the most spectacular eruptions for at least 70,000 years (the Toba human extinction event).

A giant rock like the Australian impact wipes the surface clean. Maybe some vent or seep creatures survive, but probably only microbes in the crust, and only at depth.

But after a million years or so the seas rain back down and life gets rolling again. So we have that going for us.